Ramadan 2017- Post #9: Happy Neighbour Day!

Standard

We moved to our current neighbourhood almost four years ago, and we’ve met some incredible people since. We’ve been blessed with tremendous neighbours- the type I call upon when in a bind; who shower us with friendly smiles and kind gestures; who make us feel welcomed and loved. We’ve come to love our neighbours and are so fortunate to belong to such a friendly community.

As the years have passed, I’ve forced myself outside of my comfort zone (and taken H along for the ride). I want my children to feel like Ramadan is something they can share with the various communities they belong to, not just the Muslim ones.

This Ramadan I prepared soup jars that I thought might be appreciated as all one needs to do is add water! This was actually something I planned to do last year but ran out of time. This year I made it a priority and worked in increments (around everyone’s schedules).

To make these Moroccan Lentil Soup jars, I bought and washed a bunch of mason jars.

image

Then I filled them with red lentils, layered with dehydrated onions and a spice mix as per the recipe.

 

Then added some more lentils and topped with a bay leaf.

image

I spent a good deal of time looking online for pre-made labels (how I wish I was more graphically-tech savvy) before I gave up and decided to make my own with good old scrapbook paper, tags, a pen and a gold marker I happened upon while cleaning up. I wrote the cooking directions on the back of the tag.

image

Originally, I wanted H to help me measure and prep but there was no time for that. She happily came out to deliver the jars.

A sense of community is very important to me. Taking care of neighbours is also a big part of our faith. In the Quran, God instructs us:

image

I find it remarkable how it’s not just the neighbours we know that we are supposed to do good towards, but those who we don’t know either. Inshallah I plan to expand my efforts next year to include neighbours that I don’t know as well. It’s actually my dream to host an open iftaar for everyone in my complex!

I couldn’t believe how happy the elders I delivered the jars to were to receive them (and a visit from H)! They are honestly always so touched that they haven’t been forgotten about. I really love that my kids have access to these “next door nanas” in the absence of their biological grandparents.

image

I am so grateful for our wonderful neighbours! And to a mayor who is cool enough to designate June 17 as “Neighbour Day” in my city to strengthen communities.

Happy Neighbour Day folks!

 

 

Ramadan 2017 – Post #8: Sharing Ramadan with Classmates

Standard

A few months after starting preschool in December, H expressed interest in wanting to invite all her school friends over, have a party, and celebrate with friends. I suspect that this desire was sparked by becoming more familiar with the idea of birthdays through cartoons and real-life experiences (attending other children’s birthday parties). Since her birthday falls in November and we have so far been pretty minimal about how we celebrate, I told her that we could do something for Ramadan. Now i knew that by the time Ramadan rolled around, I would be pretty freshly post-partum so I went from entertaining visions of healthy, beautifully-crafted fruit skewers, to rice krispy treats shaped like moon and stars to good-old-fashioned treat bags when the reality of post-partum life with two kids, my mom leaving and Ramadan hit.

While we still might get around to the first two ideas for another group of friends during Ramadan/for Eid, I realized they weren’t going to work for H’s school setting as the fruit wouldn’t preserve well and I think there’s a school policy around bringing in homemade food. So instead, we decided to make treat bags that included some store bought treats (granola bars and “fruit” snacks) and included some novelty items like bubbles and tattoos and dates of course. Since nature of goody bag didn’t scream “Ramadan” , I included a “Ramadan Fact Sheet for Parents” inside the bag as well as a simple message in English and French on the outside for the children (thanks to my dear friend Lynn for proofreading the French part!).

Creating and assembling the bags was a process for H. We divided it up into multiple steps and I heavily involved her (I believe that if my kids want to do something, they need to put in the effort!)
Step 1: We used dollar store paper treat bags left over from a past event and brown paper bags. We didn’t have enough of either type so we used both kinds. We decorated one side of the bags with stars and moons. To do this, we used a start-shaped cookie cutter and a sponge, roughly cut up in the shape of a moon, to stamp with using paint. H chose the paint colours. We let the bags dry overnight.
image
Step 2: I typed up, printed and cut the message from H and she glued it to the back of each bag. This allowed her to practice using a glue stick.
glue
Step 3: We filled the bags one early morning while we slept over at her grandparent’s house. Since her cousins were still sleeping and I was trying to to discourage her from making noise (the whole house tends to sleep in during Ramadan). I held baby with one hand which meant it was up to H to really fill the bags.  H carefully chose a bag for each classmate and decided which colour of bubbles and which tattoos each friend should get. I was surprised at how quickly she memorized the quantity of items to put in each bag. We slipped each friend’s name tag inside their bag so that I could finish off the bags at a later time.
sorting
Step 4: I finished off the bags and we transported them back to our house. H took the bags to school and proudly distributed them. We made a list of other friends we wanted to give Ramadan bags too. I explained it may not be possible to make bags for everyone right now but depending on how things were around Eid time, we may be able to share some more things with friends we have missed. Regardless, I was pleased to see how caring and inclusive H is!
This process, which spanned a week, not only gave H the opportunity to practice fine motor skills through stamping, gluing and filling, but also allowed her to work on numerical concepts such as collecting, sorting, sequencing and distributing and contribute to socioemotional development as she got to connect her home life to her school life. She was able to share an aspect of her life that is important to us in a setting where it isn’t discussed (public preschool). She had the chance to do something nice as she thoughtfully created the bags and selected the contents and share them with friends- this was her favourite part! I was actually not planning to add names to the bags (I figured it was more work for her teacher) and randomly select who got what, but H insisted she wanted each child’s name on a bag. This demonstrates the joy and pride children feel when something is made especially for them and the joy and pride they feel in being able to do that for others. I hope H is always this excited and secure to share her identity and experiences with others.

Ramadan 2017: Post #7- Ramadan Mubarak!!

Standard

A very special Ramadan Mubarak to our followers! May your month be blessed and abundant with opportunities for you to earn hassanat and serve your community. May you bathe in God’s mercy and find yourself under his protection. May the month be full of love and light and inspire you to be a better version of yourself!

We kicked off our first day of Ramadan by making cupcakes to share with family. This was at the top of H’s priority list. They are definitely not Pinterest-worthy and we actually cheated and used a box mix (I really hate using those) but desperate times call for desperate measures. In fact, it was my husband who ended up working with H to create the batter as Baby Gaga had other plans for me.

With the help of my awesome sisters-in-law, I also got to see my Ramadan treasure hunt come to life!

How did you welcome Ramadan into your homes? I’d love to hear about your first day and your children’s reactions in the comments 😊

 

Ramadan 2017- Post #6- Patterning and Paper Chains

Standard
Making paper chains is an easy way to decorate for various occasions. Since I wanted to give H a chance to practice more patterning, I asked her to pick three colours to create a pattern with. She chose yellow, pink and blue. Originally, I had planned to give her some scissor practice, but I couldn’t find any child-sized scissors so I was the one to cut strips from the paper she selected.
I asked her to come up with a patterning sequence. She chose pink-yellow-blue-pink-yellow-blue. Older children can be challenged to come up with more complex sequences.
She sorted the the strips into three piles to reflect the different colours. I showed her where to add glue and she started by adding glue to the strips, and I created circles. After a few turns, we switched and continued trading back and forth. Baby Gaga watched happily from the couch.
image
During this activity, we also were able to practice some french. Triggered by her comment, “Maman, fini!” we reviewed the colours she was using in french and I introduced new relevant vocabulary like “glue” and “paper.” In addition to patterning and sequencing, other mathematical concepts used during this process included counting (as she counted the rings and remaining strips) and measurement as she commented on the length of her chain saying “It’s like a long slithery snake!” This idea can further be extended by using the rings as a unit of measurement and asking children to estimate the lengths of various objects. For example, “how many rings do you think it would take to create a chain as tall as you?”
image
Creating this paper chain was also a way to foster H’s socioemotional development as it helped to build her confidence to attempt and successfully do new things. She was proud of her efforts and excited to hang the chain in our home. She couldn’t wait to show her papa when he got home from work.
image

Welcome Baby!

Standard

One last announcement before we get back to the Ramadan posts. Please welcome the newest addition to our Discovery Dome family…

image_1

Baby Gaga (as dubbed by H who refuses to call him by his actual name)

 

He joined us on May 16, 2017. And with a baby in the picture, you can be assured that I will also be posting some more baby-related content/play ideas.

The first thing I’d like to share are these three resources.

image

I bought the Baby & Toddler Play book when I was pregnant with H. I used the play ideas in this book from birth to thirty months old. I love this book! It’s exceptionally well-organized! Each activity/play idea includes a description of how it’s done, what age it’s appropriate for, what kind of play it is, what skills it helps to develop, and a photograph (although dated). The book also features research reports, lyrics to rhymes and songs, a glossary and skills index.

Since I bought the Baby Play for Everyday book after H was already a toddler, I haven’t had the chance to use it yet, but it looks promising. It starts with a visual overview of the skills babies generally develop in their first year of life and the areas of development those skills correspond to. There are twelve sections that correspond to the first twelve months of baby’s life. The sections start with an overview on changes and development and a list of skills your child can probably do and some things that some babies may be able to do. It goes on to present activity ideas in visually attractive ways with a mix of blurbs, photos and fonts. What I like about this book is that the 365 activities are not just for babies but there are ideas in there that while include baby, are done more for the caregiver (for example, positions for birth recovery, healthy snack ideas, and exercise poses).

The Reading with Babies, Toddlers and Twos is actually a book I borrowed from my local library to prepare for a workshop I was doing in April. Although I didn’t have the chance to consult the book then, I did flip through it.  This book isn’t as well-organized as the others but still contains valuable information and insight, especially in the form of lists. Sections I enjoyed included “Fun things babies do while you read,” “Ten reasons to read to your baby or toddler,” “Featured books” as well as information regarding the ages and stages in young children’s development and implications for books and reading, and many many book lists organized by features (ex. “twenty-eight especially engaging, incredible interactive books,” “Can’t put them down storybooks: blockbuster fiction for the younger set,” “ten wordless favourites” etc.

I look forward to being inspired by the content of these books and sharing them with you!

Family Friendly May Events

Standard

I interrupt my Ramadan 2017 series to bring some very cool family-friendly events to your attention. These are all local (Calgary-based) events that are happening this month. While I’ve attended all of these events in the past, I’m not sure how many I will make it to this year, but I do intend on getting my family to attend!

  1. Nagar Kirtan/Vaisakhi Parade – Saturday May 13, 2017 – Dashmesh Culture Centre: 135 Martindale Blvd NE – Opening Ceremonies at 9:30 am; Festivities from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm

This is the largest gathering I have witnessed outside of Stampede in Calgary. We’ve been meaning to check it out ever since we moved to this part of the city 4 years ago, but didn’t actually make it until last year. It’s a HUGE parade that leaves from the Dashmesh Culture Centre (Gurdwara) at 135 Martindale Blvd NE and follows a predetermined route. Roads are closed to accommodate pedestrian traffic. Even if you don’t join the parade, there is plenty to do in and around the centre. All sorts of delicious (FREE) food awaits and inside the parking lot of the centre and in the surrounding greenspace, there are lots of tables and tents set up with activities and giveaways (and lots more delicious food). You can get more information here. This photo is from the 2016 parade.

IMG_1842

These photos are from the 2017 parade.

2. Ramadan Gana Fair- Saturday May 20, 2017 – Al-Salam Centre: 6415 Ranchview Drive NW- 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Get into the Ramadan spirit by visiting this free festival (admission is free but bring cash as there will be food and products available for sale). This is the third year this festival is in operation. There will be delicious food, traditional decorations and children’s activities. A great event for Muslim families to welcome the holy month and non-Muslim families to learn more about Ramadan and fasting and experience some aspects of the vibrant and diverse culture that their Muslim neighbours belong to. You can get more information here.

story time (3) edited

3. Calgary International Children’s Festival (Kidfest) – May 24-27, 2017 – In and around the Arts Common/Olympic Plaza: 205 – 8th Avenue SE – On May 24-25, 9:30- am – 3:00 pm; On May 26-27, 9:30 am – 6:00 pm

We’ve been to this festival twice. H was 6 months the first time and 2.5 years the second time. This is hands-down one of my favourite free things to do in the city! There are ticketed shows that you can purchase tickets to as well. Chances are that your child’s daycare or school group may already make a field trip out of it, but if you want to head down with your family, I’d highly recommend it. Past attractions have included giant walk-on keyboards, all sorts of creation stations, free clown shows, large gross motor games and activities, the splash pool, dress up and free snacks. For more information, click here.  Here are some photos from our visit last year:

Ramadan 2017- Post #5- Easy Peasy Scavenger Hunt

Standard

If you’re looking for an easier alternative to the treasure hunt I recently posted, you may appreciate this Ramadan Scavenger Hunt!

DD ramadan scavenger hunt

Simply download and print the  Ramadan Scavenger Hunt and let your child(ren) find the items on the list.

A great feature about this hunt is that clues are visually depicted, making it developmentally appropriate for children as young as 18 months. Children will feel empowered being able to identify and find the objects independently. Moreover, the images help reinforce literacy skills (both visual literacy and language).

Many of these items will become naturally visible in and around your home during Ramadan (if they aren’t already on a regular basis). Print out the sheet and allow your young children to find the items on the list (note: they don’t have to collect the items- just point them out).

Another way this scavenger hunt can be used is to practice a second language. Either edit the document to include the words in a secondary language, or introduce the terms in whatever second (or third or fourth) language your child may be learning. Reinforce the terms when the items are found.

Happy Hunting!