Ramadan 2017 – Post #4: Setting up a Treasure Hunt

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This is a treasure hunt I originally created for a children’s Ramadan party a friend threw a few years ago. I have modified a few of the clues and encourage you to change around the clues and their locations to better suit your own needs and environment. Here is a brief explanation of how to set up the treasure hunt.

Backstory: You can make up a little backstory that includes your child’s interests if you like to promote dramatic and imaginative play. For example, if they like pirates, you can make the clues look like pirate clues and create a letter addressed to your child on a piece of paper that looks ancient and has been rolled into a scroll (use teabags and a lighter to brown the paper and burn the edges).

Image result for teabag pirate scroll paper

Similarly, if you are okay with creating notions like “The Ramadan Fairy” or some other mythical creature, you can use glitter and jewels…Or, create no backstory and just be honest that as parents, you have created a treasure hunt for your child.

You can download the clues I’ve prepared here: Ramadan Treasure Hunt 2017.  You can either copy the clues onto cue cards or just print and cut the document above.

treasure hunt letter

Read the initial letter to your child(ren) or if they are independent readers, hand it to them. Then, pass them the first clue (make sure to remove the “answer” portion from the bottom of the clue!) Hide the next clue where the answer for the previous clue indicates. For example, the first clue reads:

In the morning for sahoor,

Healthy foods we must eat

This large, cold place

Stores eggs, milk and meat

The children must determine that the answer is “fridge” and so they go to the fridge to find the second clue (which you have already posted there). To modify the treasure hunt for younger children who may find it difficult to solve the clues, draw hints on each clue (for example, for the clue above, draw a fridge) or better yet, include photos of those areas from your actual house. This way, children are able to rely on visual discrimination and memory recall, not just their cognitive and problem solving skills.

Although the initial treasure hunt I created involved digging for treasure at the spot marked X (outside in the sandbox), the treasure I’m using this time is far too big to bury! I created one Ramadan basket for each of the five children, so while the children are outside looking for the final clue, I will set them up on the dining table at their grandparent’s house (where the last clue will lead).

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In terms of what to include in these Ramadan baskets, I was creating them for a range of ages from just a few weeks old to seven years old. I knew I definitely wanted to include a unique book about Ramadan for each child (something that would be age appropriate).

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I toyed with the idea of getting PJs for the children and also was planning on making DIY “My First Ramadan” onesies for the two babies and pretty Ramadan t-shirts for the older three but I didn’t have time or the resources to figure that out, so I opted for matching outfits for the children!

I also included a mix of toys/activities based on the ages of the children. I had picked some stuff out from Ikea, but once again, didn’t have a chance to make it there so just went to my local dollar store. I included things such as balls, stuffies, puzzles, bubbles, art supplies, stickers, beads, and candy for the older children.

I added each child’s name to the basket and wrapped it with cellophane and ribbon. I can’t wait to see their faces

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