Welcome Baby!

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One last announcement before we get back to the Ramadan posts. Please welcome the newest addition to our Discovery Dome family…

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Baby Gaga (as dubbed by H who refuses to call him by his actual name)

 

He joined us on May 16, 2017. And with a baby in the picture, you can be assured that I will also be posting some more baby-related content/play ideas.

The first thing I’d like to share are these three resources.

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I bought the Baby & Toddler Play book when I was pregnant with H. I used the play ideas in this book from birth to thirty months old. I love this book! It’s exceptionally well-organized! Each activity/play idea includes a description of how it’s done, what age it’s appropriate for, what kind of play it is, what skills it helps to develop, and a photograph (although dated). The book also features research reports, lyrics to rhymes and songs, a glossary and skills index.

Since I bought the Baby Play for Everyday book after H was already a toddler, I haven’t had the chance to use it yet, but it looks promising. It starts with a visual overview of the skills babies generally develop in their first year of life and the areas of development those skills correspond to. There are twelve sections that correspond to the first twelve months of baby’s life. The sections start with an overview on changes and development and a list of skills your child can probably do and some things that some babies may be able to do. It goes on to present activity ideas in visually attractive ways with a mix of blurbs, photos and fonts. What I like about this book is that the 365 activities are not just for babies but there are ideas in there that while include baby, are done more for the caregiver (for example, positions for birth recovery, healthy snack ideas, and exercise poses).

The Reading with Babies, Toddlers and Twos is actually a book I borrowed from my local library to prepare for a workshop I was doing in April. Although I didn’t have the chance to consult the book then, I did flip through it. ┬áThis book isn’t as well-organized as the others but still contains valuable information and insight, especially in the form of lists. Sections I enjoyed included “Fun things babies do while you read,” “Ten reasons to read to your baby or toddler,” “Featured books” as well as information regarding the ages and stages in young children’s development and implications for books and reading, and many many book lists organized by features (ex. “twenty-eight especially engaging, incredible interactive books,” “Can’t put them down storybooks: blockbuster fiction for the younger set,” “ten wordless favourites” etc.

I look forward to being inspired by the content of these books and sharing them with you!