Ramadan 2018: Post 7- Learning Arabic Rocks!

Standard

I had an idea a while ago that I was hoping to do sometime in Ramadan to surprise H with. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, we’ve been dabbling with the Arabic alphabet for the past few years, but this year, I’m trying to reinforce what she already knows through various different games so that she can move on to start formally learning how to read the Quran.

So far, she has seen the Arabic letters in print (books and posters), on screens (often accompanied by a song) and on these cute wooden blocks I used to sell. (Note: I still have them in a variety of languages, other than Arabic so please contact me if you’re interested- the Farsi and Hindi ones are especially beautiful!)

I love the idea of a tactile resource so a few weeks ago, I finally decided to print the Arabic alphabet on rocks! I used paint pens I had previously purchased from Michaels.

image

How cute would these be to make as a gift for someone? Slip them into a canvas bag and give a child in your life a unique and functional play resource.

image

And because I like open-ended items and play things that can be used in multiple ways, I decided to paint moons and stars on the back of some of the rocks. I did this so that H could play a variation of Tic-Tac-Toe, a game she discovered a few months ago and loves playing on a dry-erase board.

image

Someone could just as easily paint or draw whatever might capture the interest of their child: animals, geometric designs or just leave them in their beautiful, natural state. I love the variety of colour, shape and size!

H found these photos on my phone last week (before I had a chance to add them into her Ramadan Calendar) so we decided to play with them. She was so excited!

image95.jpeg

And she went about ordering the alphabet (though as you can see, she doesn’t yet know that Arabic is written and read from right to left).

image

Y loves playing with them too. He turned ONE 10 days ago and loves filling and dumping things.

image

P.S. I hope you appreciated my carefully crafted pun!

P.P.S. I confess that I ran out of rocks! I still need to complete the other half of the alphabet.

 

Advertisements

Ramadan 2018: Post #3- Decorate!

Standard

We don’t really have annual decorations that we use in Ramadan. So far it’s been mainly homemade items that tie into some other area of learning or craft projects. But as the kids get older, I suspect more of a theme will emerge.

Like many adults, I swoon at the beautiful colour schemes and minimalist Ramadan decor that has taken the Western Muslim world by storm. But I know that that just wont work for my family right now (given the type of space and furniture we have and our children’s ages). We very much advocate for them feeling like this is their home too so as tempting as a magazine-inspired spread is, we aren’t there yet. Everything that’s up in our house is intentionally there- there is a story, a deeper meaning, a specific learning that happened. So I take a deep breath and let go of my expectations and do what I typically do: I consult H and then we collaborate.

The Monday before Ramadan started, we began to decorate. The first thing we did was add to our calendar. I created our Ramadan calendar 3 years ago and we have been reusing it since. It’s made from foam board, felt and a glue gun. I typically use cards made out of card stock or cut up cue cards and draw pictures on one side (because visual literacy is important and helps children make connections to text when they’re ready). Typically, the cards have activities or tasks, often linked to caring for others. As the kids needs change, I will also include more specific learning like Quranic ayat and hadeeth. See how we have used it in years past here and here.

ramadan-calendar-logoimg_3116

This year, H and I decided to make a dome. I cut out the shape from cardboard for H and she painted it. She initially chose green and then changed her mind when she saw the gold paint. I said she could add glitter to her dome so she chose purple glitter.The newly minted dome definitely gave the calendar a lift.

I had a DIY banner lying around that I had previously purchased from Dollarama. H helped me punch holes. I added yarn (we didn’t have twine or rope on hand). I was getting ready to write letters when H reminded me, “I know how to do letters!” so she ended up writing the letters I dictated. The “D” is upside down because the paper was upside down when she was writing it (I was chasing after Y in that moment).

The perfectionist in me wanted to micro-manage how she drew the letters (heck, the perfectionist in me wanted to do the letters myself!) but the educator in me rose above and recognized how meaningful and empowering it would be for H to do this herself.

I cleared H’s past artwork off of the toy shelf after asking her permission and we added some lanterns. I decided to to add some prints in some new frames I had lying around the house. (I did a Google search for free images and downloads because I didn’t feel like I had the time to browse more and pick one out but I plan to do so in the future).  She chose to add the glass candle holders and flower candles.

H has been reviewing the Arabic alphabet for what feels like years. As a fun way to review her letters (and for me to seriously assess how well she knows them) I included a little chalkboard. Each night, I write one of the 28 letters on the chalkboard (in a random order). I include a corresponding block and in the morning, H can tell me what letter it is and she attempts to draw it in the small sand tray I’ve incorporated into that space. We haven’t been very serious about learning Arabic but I do feel she’s ready to take it up a notch.

image

We also have a lamp that we’ve been hanging decorations off of, including some of H’s past and present creations. This is Y’s favourite section as he loves to hit the hanging decorations and watch them sway.

image

Lastly, I gathered all of our Ramadan related books and put them in H’s Ramadan basket from last year so we could easily find them.

image

Decoration for us is going to be an ongoing thing this Ramadan. As we create more and more things, we will integrate them into our decor. I’m curious to see how the space will look by the end of the month.

Lemonade

Standard

For a few months now, H has casually been dropping hints: “Remember that time we made lemonade?” …”I love lemonade”…”I wish we could make lemonade…”

Like many well-intentioned parents, I added it to my list of “Things to do with my children.” That list, by the way, includes a bunch of things that aren’t even developmentally appropriate anymore.

So earlier this month when I was making a rare trip to the grocery store (because since the induction of child #2 and the inception of click and collect, my trips have been drastically reduced), I saw a bag of lemons on sale and heard H’s voice in the back of my head. “Lemonade…” it eerily beckoned.

In the weeks to come, that quiet voice was soon replaced with my husband’s not so quiet voice, that demanded if I had plans for the bag of lemons…you know, other than using them as cushioning for our green bin (organics composting).

So on coincidentally, what was the first day of spring, we finally made lemonade.

 

There’s still tons of snow outside and given how many lemons we had to juice, we won’t be doing this regularly, but it was a special way to perk up an otherwise, dull, afternoon (and at least pretend like spring is on the horizon).

If I had planned in advance to make lemonade, I would have written out the recipe for H to help with her emerging literacy skills, but she did get to benefit from:

  • Fine motor practice – required hand and finger muscles to juice the lemons
  • Numeracy – to count and measure ingredients
  • Sensory – the aromatics and tasting were exciting, for Y too!
  • Experimenting – freezing water to make ice cubes, seeing the sugar dissolve into hot water and watching the consistency change; tasting the lemon juice become more diluted with every cup of water, and perhaps most exciting: seeing the colour of the juice change after adding strawberries
  • Creative Liberty– H asked about adding mint (we didn’t have any) so opted for strawberries. She’s already looking forward to playing around with different flavours.

 

Super simple sensory snow set up

Standard

I used to do a lot of sensory play with H. Because she was an early winter baby, by the time her first spring and summer rolled around, I was able to take her outside and experience our wonderful world. She felt the grass on her knees and the sand between her fingers. And I didn’t have to do a thing.

Y was born in mid-May, so he briefly experienced autumn, however he was not mobile then. He goes outside with me every day, so while he routinely feels the cold wind and the giant wet snowflakes kiss his face, he hasn’t played in the snow yet.

I’ve been dreaming about spring and summer and taking my baby out to crawl and toddle about but I woke up this morning to yet another blanket of snow (it continued to fall all day), so this afternoon I finally decided to bring some in.

It was a super easy and quick set up. I placed Y in his play yard so I could go outside and grab some fresh snow (otherwise he would’ve been up the stairs).

image I put down a table cover we use for art, and filled some snow in the baby bathtub (which is no longer used for baths). I added some kitche tools, bath toys, little people and a few sand toys that I washed off.

image

Y was eager to get to the toys. He tried three times to get the pink starfish but recoiled each time, shivering. He was not liking the cold and instead opted to just collect the people.

 

 

H played intermittently, warming up her hands in between. I offered Y some snow but he touched it and decided it was not going to happen.

 

The snow was wet and excellent for packing. I used a baking spoon to make a “macaroon” and Y took it right out of my hand and decided the snow would make a  good teething biscuit.

 

If you would like to see some great ideas for snow/ice play in indoor and outdoor settings, check out this past post.

Infants, Grasping and Emergent Curriculum

Standard

For many new parents, it’s one of the sweetest, earliest memories when their baby holds their finger. Thanks to the grasp reflex, babies are primed to wrap their palms and fingers around whatever is placed in their palms. As they grow, they lose this reflex and grasping becomes more intentional.

image

I remember noticing Y’s fondness for grasping things that provided some kind of holes. Infants often start by grabbing into gasping rings but it became very noticeable to me when he was repeatedly drawn to items with multiple holes.

image.jpeg

I decided to intentionally provide materials he could weave his fingers in to promote his interest in a safe way.

One of the first things I did was hanging up a belly dance scarf within arms reach for him to explore during a diaper change.

image

Then again with H as I looked on.

image

Because of the small coins on the scarf, I didn’t feel comfortable leaving him alone to play with it for long periods so I started thinking of what else I could create.

I remembered an idea from the book Loose Parts 2: Inspiring Play with Infants and Toddlers where embroidery hoops were used with different textured materials. So I decided to use a mesh bag that previously housed babybel cheese as my fabric of choice. I left the tag on because infants are drawn to tags.

In addition to creating this toy for him, I also became more mindful about our environment and started thinking about things we had at home that he was drawn to grasping that perhaps weren’t independently accessible (artwork, towel holder ring etc).

I’ve been ruminating over how I can make his bedroom and the children’s play space more inviting and engaging. I will share the process and results of this in a future post.

Observing Y the past few months has been especially satisfying for me because while I have quite a bit of experience using emergent curriculum (planning play environments and learning opportunities for children based on demonstrated interests, needs and abilities), it’s mostly been with preschool-aged children. To witness the amazing progression of skill in infants is really something special and these days, I find myself more drawn to creating meaningful play opportunities and environments for Y.

In the 3.5 years that have elapsed since H was this age, my knowledge and understanding of play and development has not only deepened, but I’ve been able to connect to likeminded parents and educators which continues to serve as inspiration. This along with getting to live out my learning firsthand is a reason to get excited!

Rings and Things

Standard

I remember seeing a photo on the internet somewhere of parents and educators using a paper towel holder as a stand for stacking rings, similar to the plastic or wooden rainbow coloured stacker toys commonly sold for babies. I did have a 5-ring plastic stacker toy that I bought for H in BC when she was a baby, although the middle ring has been living at my parents house in Toronto for the past 3.5 years. I thought I would give it a try for Y because we already owned a paper towel holder, and I’m all about repurposing things.

Most of the photos I had seen online used beautiful wooden rings or wonderfully beaded bracelets. Because I don’t vigilantly supervise my children when they play, I decided to pass on the beaded bracelets for now and I didn’t have any wooden rings. Coincidentally, all the rings I had were metal: curtain rings, mason jar lids and a few steel bracelets.

image.jpeg

Y doesn’t have the skills yet to stack the rings or pull them off of the paper towel holder independently yet (it’s quite tall compared to the commercial stacker toys) but he really enjoyed moving the rings up
and down.

image

He knocked the paper towel holder over and started spinning the rings. I held it horizontally for him to give him more access, and not only did he spin them, but he discovered he could make a beautiful sound when they hit one another.

image

He picked up the rings that had fallen off
the holder and proceeded to bang them together, amusing at the sound. To extend this idea, I gave him a metal spoon.

image

The sound the metal parts made when they interacted is not too different than the sound Y makes when he uses a spoon or his hand over the metal grills in our house. This is all adding to his concept of
metal among others.

Another fascinating thing we discovered together that built upon the previous post was what happened to the paper towel holder when we rolled it. Cylinders typically roll straight but since this was more of a cone shape (one end was much smaller than the other) it actually rolled in big circles. Y and I were both intrigued, especially because it still rolled (albeit not as well) with the rings on. I think it would be neat to intriduce paint one day and see where the children take it.

Update: Y played with this again today and I noticed that when its lying on its side, he has figured out how to remove the rings.

He also continues to take great joy in holding a ring in either hand and hitting them together.

image

By now he has figured out how to maneuver the holder with one hand.

As Y continues to master this, I will add other rings and experiment with size, colour and material. I intend on adding some chooriyan (traditional south Asian bangles) to the mix.

Super Easy Infant Sensory Baskets

Standard

Setting up play opportunities for infants can seem daunting: they don’t talk, they may not have clear interests and may not even be mobile. Besides, they put EVERYTHING in their mouth (an excellent way for them to collect information since they have more nerves in their mouths than in their hands, and in the early stages, more control in this part as well). Then what are you supposed to “do with them?”

There’s a host of toys designed for infants. Most of them have some combination of lights, music and lots of plastic. If you are looking for something novel and spontaneous, this may help.

It’s important to realize that even though infants may not be able to verbally communicate their learning to us, do not be fooled. Their brains are working faster than yours and mine! Simply speaking out loud to them throughout the day, narrating your activities, making eye contact and having lots of physical touch is GREAT! Taking them along and including them in the sights, sounds and smells of your daily life is FANTASTIC. Giving them the gift of early literacy by singing, reading and doing finger rhymes is AWESOME. But what about those moments when you are at home and need a few minutes to yourself?

Making up a few bins of items grouped by themes is an easy start. Ideas of baby appropriate themes may include a specific colour, various texture/fabrics, things that make sounds, a particular material like steel or wood, a particular shape like spheres or rings. Depending on the age of your infant and their physical ability, you may decide to adjust your theme. For example, my eight month old is perfectly capable of maneuvering wood and steel items because he sits independently, but I probably would not have left him alone with those items when he was four months old and still lying on his back.

These photos are of a very last minute effort that served to not only stimulate my baby, but also involve big sister, making it an engaging play experience for all parties involved. I asked my daughter to pick a colour. She picked green and I picked yellow. Then I told her to go around the house and find green things her baby brother might like to play with and collect them in her basket. When she was done, I checked the items with her. We decided to remove a small green domino because it was not safe for him to play with on his own.

 

Later, I left him with one of the baskets while I cooked dinner and he happily tasted every item. He was most engaged by the thick yellow rope. Not only was it a new object for him, but the texture, weight, material, and shape played into his interests (this will be revisited in an upcoming post).

image

Many of the items in the basket were traditional toys so the next time We do this and give ourselves more time to prepare, I’d like to challenge us to find
a greater variety of items as we think about texture, natural materials and other physical properties.