Fall Faces and Feels

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At our house, we’ve made playdough quite a few times but this was the first time we made scented playdough. And how wonderful it smells…I seriously want to eat it!

We made pumpkin spice playdough a few days ago and have been playing with it in old ways and new. Basically, just add a few tablespoons of pumpkin spice mix to your favourite playdough recipe.

We combined it with found items (bits of nature I had collected on a walk last week) and made faces.

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We used an assortment of rocks, pinecones, twigs, bark, berries, seeds, and plants.

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Perhaps more interesting was what happened when H started deconstructing the faces. She noticed the imprints the different textures were making in the playdough. Her favourites were pinecone impressions used on their heads (I had only thought to use it on its side).

Talks about the wonderful smell of the playdough led to reminiscing about the last time we used the pumpkin spice mix. It was in December to make gingerbread cookies. So we decided to make a playdough batch of cookies and decorate with natural “gummies and m&m’s”.

This led to making sprinkle cupcakes and chocolate chip muffins.

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H has a a tote box full of plastic playdough tools and cutters that we’ve amassed over the past few years but it was great to be able to use these natural materials to process our playdough. We tried using them with clay last week but this seemed to be better received.

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Reflections on an Indian School

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Earlier this year, I had the opportunity to travel to India for personal reasons. It was my first time in the country, and while I had planned on visiting some local ECE settings in Vadodara, Gujarat, my busy schedule prevented me from doing so.

I did, however, have the chance to visit a government-run elementary school (roughly grades 1-6) in the small town of Devgadh Baria in Gujarat. It was an informal visit, led by a friend/city resident. The teachers were extremely cooperative and proud to tell me about the initiatives that they were taking with the children and very curious about my life in Canada. Our communication was somewhat limited because of language barriers, but they say a picture speaks 1000 words. Here are some photos from my visit. Hover or click to read the captions.

As an educator from Canada, three things stood out to me the most:

  1. The physical environment of the school: The classrooms were small. They also happened to be dark when I visited, just before classes started for the day. I assume they receive so much natural light that the classrooms heat up quickly, which is why in an attempt to keep the rooms cool, educators keep the curtains closed when not in use. They lined the perimeter of the school in a U-shape. A covered “deck” also formed a U and bordered the classrooms. This area was used for morning assembly and prayers, with the boys on one side, and the girls on the other. There was a big, sunken, unroofed courtyard in the centre. This area is used for recreation. I cannot stop thinking about this space–just a wide open space in the centre of it all. There was no play equipment or toys (although I did see a student with  ball)…oh the possibilities!
  2. The lax attitude surrounding school: Even though classes had an official start time, classes did not begin until teachers arrived, were settled and ready to teach. Children were expected to occupy themselves until this happened. In speaking to some local teachers, I learned that attendance and punctuality among the students is a common problem in government schools. Some teachers take this as permission to show up as they will and run class according to their own schedules. This may be seen as unprofessionalism to Canadians. Another thing that was very different than professional practice in Canada is the idea of photo consent. Even though I was repeatedly told it was okay for me to photograph the children’s faces, I preferred to avoid this, instead opting for different angles or using editing tools to blur any such images.
  3. Evidence of a high-quality environment: How even in such modest conditions, teachers were striving to make their classrooms more engaging and inviting. Simple concepts like including the children’s artwork, displaying artifacts or incorporating natural and found materials really peaked my curiosity. This was most evident in math and science-related “centres”. My two-year old daughter (who accompanied me) couldn’t help but reach out and explore the tactile materials.

If you are not well-travelled, please do not assume that this is what a typical Indian school looks like. Like in any country, there is a huge variance among  the quality, appearance and curriculum of schools, often tied directly to the schools revenue stream. In a country where private/tuition-based schools are popular, it was valuable to see what a government-run school looks like. I only wish I had had more time to observe the daily routine and more opportunities to visit other approaches to schooling throughout the province.